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Identifying unknown metabolites and biomarkers


Daniel Globisch started his employment as a SciLifeLab fellow at Uppsala University in August 2015.

DanielGThe interdisciplinary research of his laboratory will focus on the analysis of metabolites in human specimen with the aim to identify unknown metabolites and biomarkers.

“Through the development of new methodologies we anticipate to enhance metabolomics-based research and simplify biomarker discovery approaches. Disease-specific biomarkers are crucial for disease prevention and disease management towards personalized medicine. Discovery of these molecules also holds a high potential for the identification of unknown biochemical pathways and new drug targets”, said Daniel Globisch.

Throughout his scientific career he has worked on the investigation and alteration of many types of single-cellular and multicellular organisms using Chemical Biology techniques. Hereby, he has recognized a tremendous potential in the analysis of metabolites to discover unknown molecules and biomarkers for the future development of new diagnostic tools.

“During my postdoctoral research at The Scripps Research Institute, I was working on the development of a non-invasive diagnostic for onchocerciasis upon discovery of a small molecule urine biomarker. Working on this project and realizing how close our research can be to application and to the improvement of patient lives has had a striking impact on my project designs.”

What you didn’t know about Daniel Globisch: He played football in clubs for over fifteen years and in the transition from his youth team to his adult team, he won three championships in three consecutive seasons.

Research Group