Promoting young researchers in synthetic biology

Published: 2015-09-16


Uppsala Genome Center supports the Uppsala University student team during the synthetic biology competition iGEM.

Each year, several groups of university and high school students participate in the international iGEM (International Genetically Engineered Machine) research competition. Each team enters with a synthetic biology project.

The SciLifeLab facility Uppsala Genome Center will, for the fifth time, support the Uppsala University team. This year, they contribute with 200 Sanger sequencing reactions. The goal of the Uppsala University team is to create bacteria capable of detecting and degrading polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH’s). These compounds are carcinogenic, and since they degrade slowly they accumulate in animals, plants, and soil.

“It is very inspiring to see the energy and enthusiasm that characterizes the work of the iGEM project. Our contribution is a relatively small investment for us, but an important part of the implementation of the project,” said Inger Jonasson, facility manager at Uppsala Genome Center.

The team consists of 24 students who have planned the project independently and spent the whole summer working on it in their lab at Uppsala Biomedical Centre. The outcome of the competition will be decided in Boston, September 24-28.