Loading Events

Molecular analysis of human diversity and its impact on drug discovery using iPS cells

September 15, 18:00 - 19:00
Watch

Venue

Air&Fire, SciLifeLab Stockholm
Tomtebodavägen 23 A
Solna, Sweden
View Venue Website
Virtual Event Virtual Event
  • This event has passed.

Molecular analysis of human diversity and its impact on drug discovery using iPS cells

Virtual Event Virtual Event

September 15, 2022 @ 18:00 19:00 UTC

Molecular analysis of human diversity and its impact on drug discovery using iPS cells

Welcome to a lecture by Professor Angus I. Lamond,

University of Dundee, UK.

16.00-17.00 Thursday September 15

Air & Fire (Gamma 2) or via zoom https://kth-se.zoom.us/s/69393882589

Professor Lamond has over thirty years of experience as a Principal Investigator, studying molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression and pre-mRNA splicing. This includes major contributions to the biochemical analysis of the human splicing machinery and to the study of functional compartments and subnuclear bodies in mammalian cells. The AIL group have developed new methods and technical approaches in these fields that have advanced mechanistic studies at the molecular and cellular levels, spanning biochemical, microscopy and MS-based proteomics technologies. During the past fifteen years, the AIL laboratory has developed and applied state of the art mass spectrometry-based proteomic approaches in research projects studying molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression in both human cells and model organisms. This includes, specifically, integrated poly-omics analyses of human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), derived from both healthy donors and patient cohorts with inherited disorders. Other studies have focused on proteome dynamics in the context of biological response mechanisms and ongoing studies identifying and characterizing small molecule modulators of alternative splicing and analysis of how splicing mechanisms affect cell proteomes, protein isoform expression and resulting cell phenotypes. He will describe the progress in using both quantitative, MS-based proteomics and high throughput imaging technologies to characterize libraries of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines, derived from hundreds of different donors, and show how comparisons of such iPSC lines can provide a novel approach for assessing mechanisms of variable drug response and help to deliver more safe new drugs that cater for the needs of diverse human populations.

This keynote lecture is part of the FEBS Advanced Course – Exploring the Human Proteome

Tomtebodavägen 23 A
Solna, Sweden
View Venue Website